SECOND HOME FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS

They grow up so fast. It seems like just yesterday they were learning how to crawl, and now your child is packing up for college. With all the overwhelming emotions you must be feeling, there’s no doubt you’re also feeling the sticker shock of paying for their education. From tuition and books to parking passes and meal plans, college is a pricey investment.

There are some costs that are just unavoidable, but there is one area of spending that could create long-term wealth for both you and your student. Have you considered buying a second home for your college student?

Before you panic at the thought of a second mortgage, let’s look at the long-term benefits of a second home, rather than paying for university housing.

Investment Strategy

When it comes to planning for your future (and your child’s) it never hurts to have a backup plan. By investing in a different market of real estate, outside of your primary residence, you have the potential to increase your investments. Owning a second home also opens up the options for your living situation after retirement.

Owning, rather than renting, a home will also allow the home to build equity. MyCollegeGuide recently said students at public universities can expect to pay an average of $8,887 each year for room and board, and those at private universities are likely to pay closer to $10,089 per year. Why not put this money toward a home that has the potential to keep making money, long after your student moves out?

Tax Benefits

As long as you use the property as a second home, and do not rent it out, you can deduct mortgage interest the same way you do on your primary residence. As a homeowner, you can deduct up to 100% of the interest you pay up to $750,000 of the total debt that is secured by both the primary home and the second home. (Note: $750,000 is the total debt between the two houses, not $750,000 each.)

When deciding on whether or not to rent out your property to another individual for the time you’re not using it, speak with a financial advisorCertain tax breaks will or will not apply, based on your specific situation.

Appreciation

College towns are perfect for property appreciation. Because new students will always be moving through, homes in the area will always be in high demand. Even after your college-aged kid moves out, you could consider renting it out to other students. Or, if you have multiple kids going to the same school, rent the property out during the years it’s being unused. (If you do this, be aware of how it will affect your taxes.)

Stability

Avoid the stress of finding a new living space each year by owning a home your child can live in for all four years of college. No move-in dates, security deposits, or storage fees.

Additional Tips

If you’re considering purchasing a second home, rather than paying sky-high prices for university housing, consider these additional tips: 

Remember all the expenses. Taking care of a home is an expensive task. From lawn care to appliance upkeep, you’ll need to factor in all of the costs of buying the home, besides just the mortgage.

Look in advance. Even if your kids are a few years away from picking a college, consider the benefits of different markets. Buying a home in one state versus another might be a deal-breaker. You’ll also need to be in good financial standing when you apply for a home loan. (Know your loan options.)

Understand scholarship requirements. If your child is awarded a scholarship through the university, living on-campus might be a requirement. Consider all the possibilities with your child in advance and stay on top of potential requirements. (Some universities will require freshman to also live on campus, no matter what.)

Help your child establish credit. If you decide to have your soon-to-be-student listed on the mortgage and deed, they will need to have some established credit before applying. Consider applying for a low-limit credit card in the student’s name or have a small car loan in their name to help with their credit rating.

Do you have more questions? Give our team of loan experts a call. 520-495-0222

Home Loan APR and Interest Rates

We understand that the mortgage process can be complex. Two key aspects of a mortgage – or really any loan – are the annual percentage rate (APR) and the interest rate. Many homebuyers, especially first-time homebuyers, may not know the difference between APR and interest rate, but with our guidance, understanding these two different costs of a home loan will be a breeze.

Interest Rate vs. APR

Interest Rate: The cost of borrowing the principal loan amount (the amount of money you are being loaned) is called the interest rate. It can be fixed or variable, but it is always expressed as a percentage.

APR: Includes the interest rate plus other costs such as fees, discount points, and some closing costs. Simply put, it is a broader measure of the cost of a mortgage. Like the interest rate, APR is always expressed as a percentage.

How does this affect your mortgage?

The interest rate calculates what your actual monthly mortgage payment will be. The APR on a loan measures the total cost of a loan. For example:

Staying for a while: Given a 30-year fixed rate loan, it makes more sense to take out a loan that has the lowest APR possible, if you plan on staying in your home for the 30-year term. You will end up paying a lower amount over the 30 years.

Not ready to settle down: It may make sense to pay fewer upfront fees at a higher rate, and a higher APR, if you don’t plan on staying in the home for more than a few years. That way the total cost will be less over the short time you are in the home.

If you have any questions about APR or interest rates, don’t hesitate to contact us!